767 matches on "President* Politic*"
Thumbnail image
"Old Tippecanoe has Come Out in the West"  Save
Description: Colored print titled "Old Tippecanoe has come out in the West, In all the wide borders his steed is the best!" It is meant to depict William Henry Harrison's log cabin on the Ohio River in North Bend, Ohio. A barrel of hard cider is by the cabin, a flag reading "Harrison & Tyler" is flying above, and Harrison is in front greeting a wounded soldier. Harrison was the Whig candidate for President in 1840 and his running mate was John Tyler. Their campaign slogan "Old Tippecanoe and Tyler Too" referred to Harrison's defeat of the Shawnee chief, Tecumseh, at Tippecanoe Creek in 1811. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: AL06227
Subjects: Hamilton County (Ohio); Ohio History -- Presidents and Politics; Harrison, William Henry, 1773-1841; Presidential campaigns
Places: North Bend (Ohio); Hamilton County (Ohio)
 
Save
Thumbnail image
Toddler in rocking chair portrait  Save
Description: This picture shows a toddler standing in a rocking chair in front of a William McKinley and Theodore Roosevelt presidential campaign poster. Handwritten on the negative is an illegible name as well as the location "Big Bend." The photograph was taken by traveling photographer Albert J. Ewing, ca. 1896-1912. Like most of Ewing's work, it was taken in southeastern Ohio or central West Virginia. Born in 1870 in Washington County, Ohio, near Marietta, Ewing most likely began his photography career in the 1890s. The 1910 US Census and a 1912-1913 directory list him as a photographer. A negative signed "Ewing Brothers" and a picture with his younger brother, Frank, indicate that Frank may have joined the business. After 1916, directories list Albert as a salesman. He died in 1934. The Ewing Collection consists of 5,055 glass plate negatives, each individually housed and numbered. Additionally, the collection includes approximately 450 modern contact prints made from the glass plate negatives. Subjects include infants and young children, elderly people, families, school and religious groups, animals and rural scenes. In 1982, the Ohio Historical Society received the collection, still housed in the original dry plate negative boxes purchased by Albert J. Ewing. A selection of the original glass plate negatives were exhibited for the first time in 2013 at the Ohio Historical Center. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: AV71_b15_f873
Subjects: Ewing, Albert J. (1870-1934); Portrait photography--United States--History; Children; McKinley, William, 1843-1901; Presidential campaigns
Places: Ohio; West Virginia
 
Save
Thumbnail image
Al Jolson and Warren G. Harding  Save
Description: Photograph of Al Jolson and Warren G. Harding singing during Harding's front porch campaign, 1920. Jolson (1886-1950) was a singer and entertainer, especially well known for the 1927 film, The Jazz Singer, the first talking picture. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: AL02785
Subjects: Motion picture actors and actresses; Entertainers; Cultural Ohio -- Popular Culture; Presidential campaigns
Places: Marion (Ohio); Marion County (Ohio)
 
Save
Thumbnail image
Warren G. Harding with Blanche Ring, Al Jolson, and Charles Evans Hughes photograph  Save
Description: This photograph shows (from left to right) Warren Harding, actress Blanche Ring (1877-1961), entertainer Al Jolson, and politician Charles Evans Hughes during the "front porch" campaign of 1920. Jolson (1886-1950) was especially well known for the 1927 film the Jazz Singer, the first talking picture. Hughes (1862-1948) was governor of New York, and a presidential candidate in 1916 (running against Woodrow Wilson). He served as Harding's secretary of state and in 1930 became chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. Harding ran his 1920 presidential campaign from the front porch of his Victorian house in Marion, Ohio. People came from all over Ohio and the United States came to hear him speak. His speeches were often recorded on phonograph and printed in newspapers around the country. Warren Gamaliel Harding (1865-1923) was born in Corsica (now called Blooming Grove), a small town in Morrow County, Ohio. Harding graduated from Ohio Central College in Iberia at the age of sixteen. His family moved to Marion, where Harding taught school and briefly studied law. He worked occasionally as a reporter for a local paper before buying the Marion Star in 1884. Within five years, the Star was one of the most successful small-town newspapers in the state. Harding became popular as the leader of the Citizen's Coronet Band, which played at political rallies, and for his skill as an orator. Willing to follow the lead of political bosses, Harding advanced rapidly in Ohio politics, serving as state senator and lieutenant governor. In 1914 Harding was elected to the U. S. Senate. He won the presidency with sixty percent of the popular vote, promising a "return to normalcy" following the wave of reforms begun during Theodore Roosevelt's administration. As president, Harding appointed several friends to federal office who proved untrustworthy. His administration was tainted by corruption, and the infamous "Teapot Dome" scandal (in which Harding's Secretary of the Interior leased a U.S. petroleum reserve to a private oil company) nearly destroyed his presidency. After he died in office in August 1923, other scandals were uncovered, further tarnishing Harding's reputation. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: Om1523_1506113_042
Subjects: Presidents and Politics; Presidential elections; Harding, Warren G. (Warren Gamaliel), 1865-1923; Hughes, Charles Evans, 1862-1948; Jolson, Al, d. 1950; Ring, Blanche; Actresses
Places: Marion (Ohio); Marion County (Ohio)
 
Save
Thumbnail image
Baby seated on quilt  Save
Description: Photograph of a baby seated on a quilt before a photograph of President William McKinley, a shotgun, and a United States flag with images of McKinley, his Vice President Theodore Roosevelt, and their campaign slogan, "Prosperity at Home, Prestige Abroad." The photograph may have been taken during the 1900 presidential campaign to show support for McKinley and Roosevelt, or to pay tribute to President McKinley after he was assassinated in September 1901. This photograph was taken by traveling photographer Albert J. Ewing, ca. 1896-1912. Like most of Ewing's work, it was likely taken in southeastern Ohio or central West Virginia. Born in 1870 in Washington County, Ohio, near Marietta, Ewing most likely began his photography career in the 1890s. The 1910 US Census and a 1912-1913 directory list him as a photographer. A negative signed "Ewing Brothers" and a picture with his younger brother, Frank, indicate that Frank may have joined the business. After 1916, directories list Albert as a salesman. He died in 1934. The Ewing Collection consists of 5,055 glass plate negatives, each individually housed and numbered. Additionally, the collection includes approximately 450 modern contact prints made from the glass plate negatives. Subjects include infants and young children, elderly people, families, school and religious groups, animals and rural scenes. In 1982, the Ohio Historical Society received the collection, still housed in the original dry plate negative boxes purchased by Albert J. Ewing. A selection of the original glass plate negatives were exhibited for the first time in 2013 at the Ohio Historical Center. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: AL05063
Subjects: Ewing, Albert J. (1870-1934); McKinley, William, 1843-1901; Presidential campaigns; Children; Portraits
Places: Ohio; West Virginia
 
Save
Thumbnail image
Woman with political campaign flag  Save
Description: This is a portrait of a well-dressed young woman sitting in front of an American flag which bears the images of President William McKinley and Vice President Theodore Roosevelt. Handwriting on the negative appears to identify the woman as Miss Rachel Riddle. This photograph was taken by traveling photographer Albert J. Ewing, ca. 1896-1912. Like most of Ewing's work, it was likely taken in southeastern Ohio or central West Virginia. Born in 1870 in Washington County, Ohio, near Marietta, Ewing most likely began his photography career in the 1890s. The 1910 US Census and a 1912-1913 directory list him as a photographer. A negative signed “Ewing Brothers” and a picture with his younger brother, Frank, indicate that Frank may have joined the business. After 1916, directories list Albert as a salesman. He died in 1934. The Ewing Collection consists of 5,055 glass plate negatives, each individually housed and numbered. Additionally, the collection includes approximately 450 modern contact prints made from the glass plate negatives. Subjects include infants and young children, elderly people, families, school and religious groups, animals and rural scenes. In 1982, the Ohio Historical Society received the collection, still housed in the original dry plate negative boxes purchased by Albert J. Ewing. A selection of the original glass plate negatives were exhibited for the first time in 2013 at the Ohio Historical Center. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: AL06259
Subjects: Ewing, Albert J. (1870-1934); Portrait photography--United States—History; Cultural Ohio -- Art and Artists; Women Suffrage; Political campaigns; Political posters; Flags -- United States; McKinley, William, 1843- 1901
Places: Ohio; West Virginia
 
Save
Thumbnail image
Woman with political campaign flag  Save
Description: This is a portrait of a young woman sitting in front of an American flag bearing the images of President William McKinley and Vice President Theodore Roosevelt. A marking on the negative reads: "Mrs. Delilia Turner." This photograph was taken by traveling photographer Albert J. Ewing, ca. 1896-1912. Like most of Ewing's work, it was likely taken in southeastern Ohio or central West Virginia. Born in 1870 in Washington County, Ohio, near Marietta, Ewing most likely began his photography career in the 1890s. The 1910 US Census and a 1912-1913 directory list him as a photographer. A negative signed “Ewing Brothers” and a picture with his younger brother, Frank, indicate that Frank may have joined the business. After 1916, directories list Albert as a salesman. He died in 1934. The Ewing Collection consists of 5,055 glass plate negatives, each individually housed and numbered. Additionally, the collection includes approximately 450 modern contact prints made from the glass plate negatives. Subjects include infants and young children, elderly people, families, school and religious groups, animals and rural scenes. In 1982, the Ohio Historical Society received the collection, still housed in the original dry plate negative boxes purchased by Albert J. Ewing. A selection of the original glass plate negatives were exhibited for the first time in 2013 at the Ohio Historical Center. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: AL06272
Subjects: Ewing, Albert J. (1870-1934); Portrait photography--United States—History; Presidents -- United States; Cultural Ohio -- Art and Artists; McKinley, William, 1843- 1901
Places: Ohio; West Virginia
 
Save
Thumbnail image
Richard M. Bishop portrait  Save
Description: Engraved portrait of Richard Moore Bishop (1812-1893), who served as mayor of Cincinnati from 1859-1861 and as governor of Ohio from 1878-1880. Below picture: Photo by Brady. Eng[d superscript] by H.B. Hall & Sons 61 Fulton S[t superscript]. N.Y. Signature at bottom: R.M. Bishop View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: AL03889
Subjects: Governors -- Ohio; Ohio--Politics and government; Bishop, Richard M., 1812-1890
Places: Ohio
 
Save
Thumbnail image
William Jennings Bryan speech in Parkersburg  Save
Description: This photograph shows a large crowd of people listening to a speech by presidential candidate William Jennings Bryan in Parkersburg, West Virginia, September 1896. Bryan was campaigning for president on the Democratic ticket, and over the course of that campaign delivered 500 speeches across 27 states. He was narrowly defeated for office in the popular vote by William McKinley. Bryan would run for president again in 1900, attacking President William McKinley for involving the United States in the Spanish American War. After losing a third bid for the presidency in 1908, he would go on to serve as secretary of state under Woodrow Wilson. This photograph was taken by traveling photographer Albert J. Ewing, ca. 1896-1912. Like most of Ewing's work, it was likely taken in southeastern Ohio or central West Virginia. Born in 1870 in Washington County, Ohio, near Marietta, Ewing most likely began his photography career in the 1890s. The 1910 US Census and a 1912-1913 directory list him as a photographer. A negative signed "Ewing Brothers" and a picture with his younger brother, Frank, indicate that Frank may have joined the business. After 1916, directories list Albert as a salesman. He died in 1934. The Ewing Collection consists of 5,055 glass plate negatives, each individually housed and numbered. Additionally, the collection includes approximately 450 modern contact prints made from the glass plate negatives. Subjects include infants and young children, elderly people, families, school and religious groups, animals and rural scenes. In 1982, the Ohio Historical Society received the collection, still housed in the original dry plate negative boxes purchased by Albert J. Ewing. A selection of the original glass plate negatives were exhibited for the first time in 2013 at the Ohio Historical Center. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: AV71_b06_f371
Subjects: Presidential campaigns; Photography -- History; Politicians; Ewing, Albert J. (1870-1934);
Places: Parkersburg (West Virginia)
 
Save
Thumbnail image
Warren G. Harding and Al Jolson photographs  Save
Description: These photographs show Warren Harding with Al Jolson during the 1920 "front porch" campaign. Jolson (1886-1950) was a singer and entertainer, especially well known for the 1927 film the Jazz Singer, the first talking picture. The first image shows Warren Harding on the far left and Jolson on the far right, standing next to Florence Harding. In the second image, Jolson is talking to the crowd on the Harding's front porch, while Harding stands in the background. Warren Harding ran his 1920 presidential campaign from the front porch of his Victorian house in Marion, Ohio. People came from all over Ohio and the United States came to hear him speak. His speeches were often recorded on phonograph and printed in newspapers around the country. Warren Gamaliel Harding (1865-1923) was born in Corsica (now called Blooming Grove), a small town in Morrow County, Ohio. Harding graduated from Ohio Central College in Iberia at the age of sixteen. His family moved to Marion, where Harding taught school and briefly studied law. He worked occasionally as a reporter for a local paper before buying the Marion Star in 1884. Within five years, the Star was one of the most successful small-town newspapers in the state. Harding became popular as the leader of the Citizen's Coronet Band, which played at political rallies, and for his skill as an orator. Willing to follow the lead of political bosses, Harding advanced rapidly in Ohio politics, serving as state senator and lieutenant governor. In 1914 Harding was elected to the U. S. Senate. He won the presidency with sixty percent of the popular vote, promising a "return to normalcy" following the wave of reforms begun during Theodore Roosevelt's administration. As president, Harding appointed several friends to federal office who proved untrustworthy. His administration was tainted by corruption, and the infamous "Teapot Dome" scandal (in which Harding's Secretary of the Interior leased a U.S. petroleum reserve to a private oil company) nearly destroyed his presidency. After he died in office in August 1923, other scandals were uncovered, further tarnishing Harding's reputation. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: Om1523_1506773_009
Subjects: Presidents and Politics; Presidential elections; Harding, Warren G. (Warren Gamaliel), 1865-1923; Jolson, Al, d. 1950; Harding, Florence Kling, 1860-1924; First ladies; Porches
Places: Marion (Ohio); Marion County (Ohio)
 
Save
Thumbnail image
Warren Harding Jennings photograph  Save
Description: Photograph of Warren Harding Jennings, of Columbus, Ohio, on January 1, 1921. Writing on the back indicates that he was 5 months and 3 weeks old when this picture was taken, and weighed 20.5 pounds. This image comes from a group of photographs of babies and young children named after President Warren G. Harding, which were sent to Harding while he was in office and eventually transferred to the Ohio Historical Society from the Harding Memorial Association. Harding’s election provided a short burst of popularity for the name Warren, which had been steadily gaining in popularity during the 1910s. According to data from the Social Security Administration, the name rose from 122nd place in 1910 to 82nd place in 1919, with its largest jump in 1920 when it reached 39th. It jumped again in 1921, ranking 24th that year. After Harding's election in November of 1921, and his subsequent death on August 2, 1923, the name declined in popularity throughout the 20th century. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: P146_B45F01_001_001
Subjects: Harding, Warren G. (Warren Gamaliel), 1865-1923; Children; Portrait photography; Presidents--United States--1920-1930
Places: Columbus (Ohio); Franklin County (Ohio)
 
Save
Thumbnail image
Warren Harding Callahan photograph  Save
Description: Photograph of Warren Harding Callahan, of Marion, Ohio, addressed to then-Senator Warren G. Harding, ca. November 1920. Writing on the back indicates that he was four months old when this picture was taken, and weighed 18 pounds. This image comes from a group of photographs of babies and young children named after President Warren G. Harding, which were sent to Harding while he was in office and eventually transferred to the Ohio Historical Society from the Harding Memorial Association. Harding’s election provided a short burst of popularity for the name Warren, which had been steadily gaining in popularity during the 1910s. According to data from the Social Security Administration, the name rose from 122nd place in 1910 to 82nd place in 1919, with its largest jump in 1920 when it reached 39th. It jumped again in 1921, ranking 24th that year. After Harding's election in November of 1921, and his subsequent death on August 2, 1923, the name declined in popularity throughout the 20th century. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: P146_B45F01_002_001
Subjects: Harding, Warren G. (Warren Gamaliel), 1865-1923; Children; Portrait photography; Presidents--United States--1920-1930;
Places: Marion (Ohio); Marion County (Ohio);
 
Save
767 matches on "President* Politic*"