1323 matches on "architectur*"
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Cleveland residences  Save
Description: Caption reads: "Cleveland Residences. District 4, Cleveland, Ohio. Credit Line: Dean Bacon, W.R.U. School of Architecture." This is a photograph of several homes in Cleveland, Ohio. More information needed. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: SA1039AV_B04F08_09_01
Subjects: Cleveland (Ohio)--Buildings, structures, etc.; Architecture, Domestic--Ohio--Pictorial works.; Dwellings; Neighborhoods--United States—History; Architecture, Domestic; Ohio--History--Pictorial works; Federal Writers' Project
Places: Cleveland (Ohio); Cuyahoga County (Ohio)
 
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Toledo Museum of Art photograph  Save
Description: This exterior photograph of the Toledo Museum of Art shows its white marble façade and sixteen ionic columns, designed in Neoclassical (Classical Revival) architectural style. The building, which opened in 1912, was designed by Edward B. Green and Harry W. Wachter. The photograph’s vantage point emphasizes the museum’s landscaped environment that includes trees, shrubs, and an expanse of lawn. The museum was founded in 1901 by two artists, an attorney, an architect, an industrialist, a realtor, and a journalist. In 1907, Edward Drummond Libbey (1854-1925) and his wife, Florence Scott Libbey, donated six acres of land on Monroe Street for the site of a new building. Libbey was the founder of the Libbey Glass Company and the Libbey-Owens Sheet Glass Company, both located in Toledo. Since 1912 the museum campus has grown substantially. It now comprises 36 acres with six buildings. Due to the benevolences of its founders and membership support, the museum remains a privately endowed, nonprofit institution. Admission is free and open to the public six days per week, 309 days per year. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: AL06161
Subjects: Toledo Museum of Art; Architecture--Ohio; Toledo (Ohio); Neoclassicism (Architecture); Galleries and museums; Greek revival (Architecture); Libbey, Edward Drummond, 1854-1925
Places: Toledo (Ohio); Lucas County (Ohio)
 
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Gothic Hall and Cloisters, Toledo Museum of Art, illustration  Save
Description: This picture postcard shows an interior view of the Cloisters, the Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio. The color illustration reveals the stone floor and arcades, three of which were taken from a medieval cloister. The Cloisters were part of a 1933 expansion of the original Neoclassical (Classical Revival) museum building, which had been designed by Edward B. Green and Harry W. Wachter and which opened in 1912. An earlier expansion, in 1926, added the Gothic Hall, where tapestries, sculpture, and stained glass. Although the caption on this postcard image identifies the location as the Gothic Hall and Cloisters Gallery, the image likely shows only the Cloisters area. The Gothic Hall incorporated vaulted ribs, which are not visible in this image. In 1982 the Gothic Hall and Gallery were renovated to create space for a museum entrance on Grove Street, a grand staircase, and the Canaday Gallery. The Toledo Art Museum was founded in 1901 by two artists, an attorney, an architect, an industrialist, a realtor, and a journalist. In 1907, Edward Drummond Libbey (1854-1925) and his wife, Florence Scott Libbey, donated six acres of land on Monroe Street for the site of a new building. Libbey was the founder of the Libbey Glass Company and the Libbey-Owens Sheet Glass Company, both located in Toledo. Since 1912 the museum campus has grown substantially. It now comprises 36 acres with six buildings. Due to the benevolences of its founders and membership support, the museum remains a privately endowed, nonprofit institution. Admission is free and open to the public six days per week, 309 days per year. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: AL06162
Subjects: Toledo Museum of Art; Architecture--Ohio; Toledo (Ohio); Neoclassicism (Architecture); Galleries and museums; Greek revival (Architecture); Libbey, Edward Drummond, 1854-1925
Places: Toledo (Ohio); Lucas County (Ohio)
 
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Toledo Museum of Art photograph  Save
Description: This photograph shows the Monroe Street entrance to the Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio. The original building, which opened in 1912, was designed in the Neoclassical (Classical Revival) architectural style by Edward B. Green and Harry W. Wachter. The photograph’s vantage point emphasizes the museum’s landscaped environment that includes trees, shrubs, and lawn. The Toledo Museum of Art underwent two expansions, in 1926 and in 1933. The museum's east and west wings, which are visible in this photograph, were added in 1933. The museum was founded in 1901 by two artists, an attorney, an architect, an industrialist, a realtor, and a journalist. In 1907, Edward Drummond Libbey (1854-1925) and his wife, Florence Scott Libbey, donated six acres of land on Monroe Street for the site of a new building. Libbey was the founder of the Libbey Glass Company and the Libbey-Owens Sheet Glass Company, both located in Toledo. Since 1912 the museum campus has grown substantially. It now comprises 36 acres with six buildings. Due to the benevolences of its founders and membership support, the museum remains a privately endowed, nonprofit institution. Admission is free and open to the public six days per week, 309 days per year. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: AL06166
Subjects: Toledo Museum of Art; Architecture--Ohio; Toledo (Ohio); Neoclassicism (Architecture); Galleries and museums; Greek revival (Architecture); Libbey, Edward Drummond, 1854-1925
Places: Toledo (Ohio); Lucas County (Ohio)
 
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Ambrose Burnside home photograph  Save
Description: Dated January 1938, this photograph shows the Burnside House in Cincinnati, Ohio, in Hamilton County. The Burnside House was located on the block of East Ninth Street at 24 East Ninth, which is now the Public Library of Cincinnati. This three story red brick building was once General Burnside's headquarters during the Civil War. Ambrose Burnside was a Union Army General, as well as a politician, industrialist and an inventor. It was from this house that he issued Order 38, which stated "The habit of declaring sympathy for the enemy will not be allowed." His characteristic facial hair led to the style which is now called sideburns. Signs on front of the building read "24 East Ninth" and "Hotel America, for Ladies and Gentlemen, Rates Weekly $3 up, Night 75 cents up." This photograph is one of the many visual materials collected for use in the Ohio Guide. In 1935, President Franklin D. Roosevelt established the Works Progress Administration by executive order to create jobs for the large numbers of unemployed laborers, as well as artists, musicians, actors, and writers. The Federal Arts Program, a sector of the Works Progress Administration, included the Federal Writers’ Project, one of the primary goals of which was to complete the America Guide series, a series of guidebooks for each state which included state history, art, architecture, music, literature, and points of interest to the major cities and tours throughout the state. Work on the Ohio Guide began in 1935 with the publication of several pamphlets and brochures. The Reorganization Act of 1939 consolidated the Works Progress Administration and other agencies into the Federal Works Administration, and the Federal Writers’ Project became the Federal Writers’ Project in Ohio. The final product was published in 1940 and went through several editions. The Ohio Guide Collection consists of 4,769 photographs collected for use in Ohio Guide and other publications of the Federal Writers’ Project in Ohio from 1935-1939. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: SA1039AV_B03F05_016_001
Subjects: Architecture, Domestic--Ohio--Pictorial works.; Cincinnati (Ohio)--Buildings, structures, etc.; Hotels; Ohio Federal Writers' Project
Places: Cincinnati (Ohio); Hamilton County (Ohio)
 
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Residential street with townhouses photograph  Save
Description: A photograph of a residential development. The street has sidewalks on each side, and on the right side a pair of pedestrians is seen walking. There are several automobiles parked at the curb. Trees are periodically planted in the tree lawns between the street and sidewalk, and their trunks are protected with plastic sleeves. The buildings are of uniform style; each is two stories with four front entrances for each building. The buildings have very small stoops in front of their entrances. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: SA1039AV_B07F06_002_1
Subjects: Row Architecture, Domestic--Ohio--Pictorial works.; Apartment Architecture, Domestic--Ohio--Pictorial works.; Neighborhoods; Sidewalks
Places: Ohio
 
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Housing complex photograph  Save
Description: The photograph shows a central lawn with several young trees. This green space is surrounded on three sides by town houses. Sidewalks line each side of the lawn, and there are several benches in front of the buildings. The buildings are all two stories tall and made of brick. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: SA1039AV_B07F06_004_1
Subjects: Dwellings; Housing; Row Architecture, Domestic--Ohio--Pictorial works.; Apartment Architecture, Domestic--Ohio--Pictorial works.
Places: Ohio
 
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Row housing photograph  Save
Description: The photograph shows a city street as it rises up a hill. The dirt road has two rows of houses along each side as well as paved sidewalks. Wooden fences run along the street on each side. The houses are wooden with steep gables. They have two full stories as well as tall attic spaces. A fire hydrant is visible at the street corner in the foreground of the picture. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: SA1039AV_B07F06_005_1
Subjects: Row Architecture, Domestic--Ohio--Pictorial works.; Apartment Architecture, Domestic--Ohio--Pictorial works.; Neighborhoods; Sidewalks
Places: Ohio
 
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Apartment complex photograph  Save
Description: Dated to ca. 1930-1939, this photograph shows a central lawn surrounded on three sides by apartment buildings. The lawn is filled with several groups of people, both adults and children. The surrounding buildings are four stories tall with flat roofs and brick exteriors. Benches line the sidewalks which surround the open green space. This photograph is one of the many visual materials collected for use in the Ohio Guide. In 1935, President Franklin D. Roosevelt established the Works Progress Administration by executive order to create jobs for the large numbers of unemployed laborers, as well as artists, musicians, actors, and writers. The Federal Arts Program, a sector of the Works Progress Administration, included the Federal Writers’ Project, one of the primary goals of which was to complete the America Guide series, a series of guidebooks for each state which included state history, art, architecture, music, literature, and points of interest to the major cities and tours throughout the state. Work on the Ohio Guide began in 1935 with the publication of several pamphlets and brochures. The Reorganization Act of 1939 consolidated the Works Progress Administration and other agencies into the Federal Works Administration, and the Federal Writers’ Project became the Federal Writers’ Project in Ohio. The final product was published in 1940 and went through several editions. The Ohio Guide Collection consists of 4,769 photographs collected for use in Ohio Guide and other publications of the Federal Writers’ Project in Ohio from 1935-1939. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: SA1039AV_B07F06_006_1
Subjects: Dwellings; Children; Housing; Apartment Architecture, Domestic--Ohio--Pictorial works.; Lawns; Ohio--History--Pictorial works; Federal Writers' Project
Places: Ohio
 
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Mary Hanna home photograph  Save
Description: Caption reads "Residence of Miss Mary Hanna, 2581 Grandin Road, built in 1900, of Bedford blue stone, is a model of English architecture. Photo by Federal Writers' Photographer, District #2, July 1, 1937. Cincinnati, Ohio" Photograph showing the Mary Hanna home, located on Grandin Road in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Cincinnati, Ohio. Built in the Romanesque Revival style of architecture, this home was completed in 1906 by the architectural firm of Elzner and Anderson. Mary Hanna was the daughter of wealthy industrialist Henry Hanna, who made his fortune in coal, iron, railroads and real estate. She is known for her philanthropy toward the Cincinnati Art Museum and the children of Cincinnati. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: SA1039AV_B03F05_036
Subjects: Romanesque revival (Architecture--Ohio--Pictorial works.)--United States; Cincinnati (Ohio)--Buildings, structures, etc
Places: Cincinnati (Ohio); Hamilton County (Ohio)
 
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Mitchell-Turner-Henry House photograph  Save
Description: Zenas King (1818-1892) built this house in 1847. It is an example of Greek Revival architecture. King founded the King Bridge Company of Cleveland, Ohio and invented the iron suspension bridge. The house has a temple front, rare west of the Cuyahoga River. It is noted for its portico supported by ionic columns and hand carved fretwork on the pediment, as well as its use of undersized bricks. The house still stands at 128 Center Street. The temple portico has an entablature with dentil detailing and a triangular gable known as a pediment. The tympanum, or face of the pediment, is decorated with shells and scrolls. Pilasters are found at the front corners and give the illusion of additional columns. The first floor windows are ornamented with anthemion, a conventionalized leaf ornament which appears to radiate from a single point. The northern and southern wings give the house an asymmetrical appearance. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: SA1039AV_B01F09_013_001
Subjects: Architecture--Ohio--Pictorial works.; Architecture, Domestic--Ohio--Pictorial works.; Dwellings; Milan (Ohio)--History; Neighborhoods--United States--History; Ohio--History--Pictorial works; Federal Writers' Project
Places: Milan (Ohio); Erie County (Ohio); Huron County (Ohio)
 
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Newcom's Tavern photograph  Save
Description: Caption reads: "The Old Log Cabin, or Newcom's Tavern, Van Cleve Park, Dayton. The O. R. M. C. MARKER read, Newcom Tavern. Dayton's first Tavern and courthouse. In the War of 1812, was quartermaster's headquarters, Col. Robert Patterson commanding. Restored by the D. A. R. for Historical Society Museum." "Colonel George Newcom, one of Dayton's first settlers, constructed this two-story log house in 1796. Newcom engaged Robert Edgar, a millwright, to build "the best house in Dayton." The original house consisted of one room upstairs and one room on the ground floor, with a door facing the river. In 1798, a two-story addition was added south of the original structure, with a new door facing Main Street. Since the tavern was a large two-story building, it soon became the center of village activity, as well as overnight lodging for travelers. The first court sessions were held in the tavern, and it served as a place for school and church services. The Newcoms sold the tavern in 1815, and ownership changed several times during the next twenty years. In 1838, Joseph Shaffer purchased the structure at a Sheriff's auction and converted it into a general store. The building remained "Shaffer's Store" for the next 56 years. In 1894, architect Charles Insco Williams started to raze it to make way for an apartment building when removal of the clapboards revealed the original logs. John Cotterill owned the building and offered to donate it to the city, provided it was moved off the property. Acting on the recommendations of the "Log Cabin Committee, " the city approved moving the tavern to Van Cleve Park. John H. Patterson, founder of The National Cash Register Company, paid for the move. The Daughters of the American Revolution raised money by public subscription to have it restored, and the Dayton Historical Society was organized to operate it as a museum. In the 1960s, the Montgomery Historical Society donated the tavern and related collections to Carillon Historical Park. Newcom Tavern made its final move in the fall of 1964. Today, now Dayton's oldest standing building, Newcom Tavern stands in Carillon Historical Park, approximately two miles south of its original site. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: SA1039AV_B02F02_008_1
Subjects: Taverns (Inns)--Ohio; Log-end Architecture, Domestic--Ohio--Pictorial works.; Architecture, Domestic--Ohio--Pictorial works.; Architecture--Ohio; Dayton (Ohio)--Buildings, structures, etc.--Pictorial works; Patterson, Robert, 1753-1827; Ohio--History--Pictorial works; Federal Writers' Project
Places: Dayton (Ohio); Montgomery County (Ohio)
 
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1323 matches on "architectur*"