293 matches on "arts entertainment"
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Warren G. Harding thanking cook photograph  Save
Description: This photograph, which measures 5" by 7" (12 by 18 cm), shows President Warren G. Harding thanking the cook during a 1921 camping trip with automobile manufacturer Henry Ford, rubber manufacturer Harvey Firestone, and inventor Thomas Edison. This camping trip was one of many that Ford, Firestone, and Edison took between 1916 and 1924. President Harding was invited to their camping trip in Maryland in July of 1921, which became known as "Camp Harding." Warren Gamaliel Harding (1865-1923) was born in Corsica (now called Blooming Grove), a small town in Morrow County, Ohio. Harding graduated from Ohio Central College in Iberia at the age of sixteen. His family moved to Marion, where Harding taught school and briefly studied law. He worked occasionally as a reporter for a local paper before buying the Marion Star in 1884. Within five years, the Star was one of the most successful small-town newspapers in the state. Warren Gamaliel Harding (1865-1923) was born in Corsica (now called Blooming Grove), a small town in Morrow County, Ohio. Harding graduated from Ohio Central College in Iberia at the age of sixteen. His family moved to Marion, where Harding taught school and briefly studied law. He worked occasionally as a reporter for a local paper before buying the Marion Star in 1884. Within five years, the Star was one of the most successful small-town newspapers in the state. Harding became popular as the leader of the Citizen's Coronet Band, which played at political rallies, and for his skill as an orator. Willing to follow the lead of political bosses, Harding advanced rapidly in Ohio politics, serving as state senator and lieutenant governor. In 1914 Harding was elected to the U. S. Senate. He launched his famous "front porch" 1920 presidential campaign from the porch of his Victorian home in Marion, Ohio. He won the presidency with sixty percent of the popular vote, promising a "return to normalcy" following the wave of reforms begun during Theodore Roosevelt's administration. As President, Harding appointed several friends to federal office who proved untrustworthy. His administration was tainted by corruption, and the infamous "Teapot Dome" scandal (in which Harding's Secretary of the Interior leased a U.S. petroleum reserve to a private oil company) nearly destroyed his presidency. After he died in office in August 1923, other scandals were uncovered, further tarnishing Harding's reputation. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: Om1523_1505984_038
Subjects: Presidents and Politics; Sports; Arts and Entertainment; Camping; Harding, Warren G. (Warren Gamaliel), 1865-1923
Places: Marion (Ohio); Marion County (Ohio); Pecktonville (Maryland)
 
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Howard Chandler Christy at Unveiling of "The Signing of the Treaty of Greene Ville" photograph  Save
Description: Three 5" by 7" (12.7 by 17.8 cm) photographs depict some of the celebrations in honor of the 150th anniversary of the Treaty of Greenville, which took place in August 1945. Events included a parade, an appreciation dinner for artist Howard Chandler Christy, and exhibition of the original Treaty of Greenville, on loan from the National Archives. The state of Ohio commissioned Christy (1873-1952), a nationally-known illustrator, to create the work for the 150th anniversary of the treaty that ended the Indian Wars in Ohio. The painting "The Signing of the Treaty of Greene Ville" was unveiled in a ceremony on August 3. Christy (in the white suit) can be seen sitting on the left in the first and second images. Governor Frank Lausche is seated next to him and can be seen addressing the crowd in the third image. Christy, born just south of Zanesville in Duncan Falls, Ohio, went to New York to study art at the age of sixteen. He began working at Scribner's Magazine in 1898 as an illustrator. During the Spanish American War, his illustrations of Cuba and Puerto Rico were seen around the United States. He returned to Duncan Falls after the war and began painting. By the early twentieth century Christy's elegant illustrations of women, collectively called "Christy Girls," appeared in Scribner's, Century, Ladies Home Journal, McClure's, and several books. Christy Girls were also used in recruitment posters during World War I. Christy began painting portraits after World War I; his best-known subjects were Calvin Coolidge, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Amelia Earhart, and Douglas MacArthur. The Depression of the 1930s changed Christy's artistic emphasis to historical subjects. In addition to the Greenville painting, Christy painted the "Scene of the Signing of the Constitution of the United States," which hangs in the Capitol in Washington, DC. View on Ohio Memory.
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Subjects: Ohio Government; Military Ohio; American Indians in Ohio; Arts and Entertainment; Christy, Howard Chandler, 1873-1952; Treaty of Greenville; Treaties; Celebrations; Lausche, Frank John, b. 1895; Governors; Artists
Places: Greenville (Ohio); Darke County (Ohio)
 
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Hawk effigy pipe photograph  Save
Description: This pipe in effigy (a likeness or representation) of a hawk was excavated from Tremper Mound, a Hopewell culture site located five miles north of Portsmouth in Scioto County. It was identified by archeologist William C. Mills as an eagle. Made of light gray or pale brown coral limestone, the curvature of the pipe platform is greater than other effigy pipes found within Tremper Mound. The pipe measures approximately 2.2" x 2.15" x 4.88" (5.5 x 5.2 x 12.3 cm). This pipe is part of a large collection of pipes found at Tremper Mound. The pipes were carved of Ohio pipestone, a silica-based material that can be easily carved when freshly quarried from the hills east of the Scioto River. The pipes represent a variety of animals significant to the Hopewell, including owls, wolves, deer and beaver. Skilled Hopewell craftsmen carved the pipes with flint knives and some are embellished with pearls or copper. In Ohio, the Hopewell Indians (100 B.C.-A.D. 500) built burial mounds and large earthen enclosures in geometric shapes (circles, squares, and octagons) to mark the places where the people gathered periodically to participate in many social and ceremonial events. Some of these sites were quite large--the Newark Earthworks complex extends over a 4-square-mile area. The Hopewell people also maintained a large trade network extending as far as the Rocky Mountains of Wyoming, the Florida coast and Appalachians, and northern Lake Superior. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: Om1357_1763334_017
Subjects: American Indians in Ohio; Plants and Animals; Arts and Entertainment; Geography and Natural Resources; Hopewell culture; Mounds (Burials); Pipes (Smoking); Hawks; Birds
Places: Rush Township (Ohio); Scioto County (Ohio)
 
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Vinton County Homecoming photograph  Save
Description: This panoramic photograph of a homecoming celebration in McArthur, Ohio, was taken in 1924. The Hamden band forms the center of the photograph, surrounded by townspeople who attended the event. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: Om1924_3737246_001
Subjects: Arts and Entertainment; Celebrations; Music; Bands; Hats
Places: McArthur (Ohio); Vinton County (Ohio)
 
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Zoar Lake photographs  Save
Description: Two photographs document Zoar Lake in Tuscarawas County. The first photograph shows two women fishing. The second is a sunset scene at the lake. The photographs measure 8" x 10" (20.32 x 25.4 cm). View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: Om3171_3805455_001
Subjects: Ohio Women; Arts and Entertainment; Geography and Natural Resources; Lakes & ponds; Fishing
Places: Zoar (Ohio); Tuscarawas County (Ohio)
 
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Quail effigy pipe photograph  Save
Description: This pipe in effigy (a likeness or representation) of a quail was excavated from Tremper Mound, a Hopewell culture site located five miles north of Portsmouth in Scioto County. The bird stands on the platform. The bowl of the pipe was wrapped with copper in prehistoric times, and the eyes were likely inset with copper. The pipe, which measures approximately 1.75" x 1.45" x 2.9" (4.5 x 3.6 x 7.4 cm), is made of a very dark gray stone. This pipe is part of a large collection of pipes found at Tremper Mound. The pipes were carved of Ohio pipestone, a silica-based material that can be easily carved when freshly quarried from the hills east of the Scioto River. The pipes represent a variety of animals significant to the Hopewell, including owls, wolves, deer and beaver. Skilled Hopewell craftsmen carved the pipes with flint knives and some are embellished with pearls or copper. In Ohio, the Hopewell Indians (100 B.C.-A.D. 500) built burial mounds and large earthen enclosures in geometric shapes (circles, squares, and octagons) to mark the places where the people gathered periodically to participate in many social and ceremonial events. Some of these sites were quite large--the Newark Earthworks complex extends over a 4-square-mile area. The Hopewell people also maintained a large trade network extending as far as the Rocky Mountains of Wyoming, the Florida coast and Appalachians, and northern Lake Superior. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: Om1357_1764244_056
Subjects: American Indians in Ohio; Plants and Animals; Arts and Entertainment; Geography and Natural Resources; Hopewell culture; Mounds (Burials); Pipes (Smoking); Quails; Birds
Places: Rush Township (Ohio); Scioto County (Ohio)
 
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Raccoon effigy pipe photograph  Save
Description: This pipe in effigy (a likeness or representation) of a raccoon was excavated from Tremper Mound, a Hopewell culture site located five miles north of Portsmouth in Scioto County. The animal is seated on its haunches with its left paw in a crayfish hole. The raccoon's eyes are drilled and set with copper. The tip of the nose and right ear have been restored, as has the left side of platform. The pipe measures 1.5" x 2" x 3.5" (3.81 x 5.08 x 8.89 cm). This pipe is part of a large collection of pipes found at Tremper Mound. The pipes were carved of Ohio pipestone, a silica-based material that can be easily carved when freshly quarried from the hills east of the Scioto River. The pipes represent a variety of animals significant to the Hopewell, including owls, wolves, deer and beaver. Skilled Hopewell craftsmen carved the pipes with flint knives and some are embellished with pearls or copper. In Ohio, the Hopewell Indians (100 B.C.-A.D. 500) built burial mounds and large earthen enclosures in geometric shapes (circles, squares, and octagons) to mark the places where the people gathered periodically to participate in many social and ceremonial events. Some of these sites were quite large--the Newark Earthworks complex extends over a 4-square-mile area. The Hopewell people also maintained a large trade network extending as far as the Rocky Mountains of Wyoming, the Florida coast and Appalachians, and northern Lake Superior. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: Om1357_1136415_064
Subjects: American Indians in Ohio; Plants and Animals; Arts and Entertainment; Geography and Natural Resources; Hopewell culture; Mounds (Burials); Pipes (Smoking); Raccoons
Places: Rush Township (Ohio); Scioto County (Ohio)
 
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Neil Armstrong Homecoming Parade photographs  Save
Description: Six 2" x 2" (5.08 x 5.08 cm) photographs document a homecoming parade held for astronaut Neil Armstrong in 1969. More than 80,000 supporters greeted Armstrong upon his return to Wapakoneta, Ohio on September 6, 1969. Hope served as marshal for the event, and guests included "Tonight Show" sidekick Ed McMahon, and Dr. Albert Sabin, who invented the polio vaccine. Hope joked with the crowd that Armstrong was adjusting well to life on Earth after his space visit, "but he keeps throwing his shoes out the window and eating toothpaste," referring to the system of trash disposal on early flights and the practice of packaging astronauts' food in tubes. Neil A. Armstrong (b. 1930), the first man to walk on the moon, was born in Wapakoneta. He received Bachelor and Master of Science degrees in aeronautical engineering from Purdue University. After serving as a naval aviator from 1949 to 1952, Armstrong joined the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) in 1955. For the next 17 years he worked for NACA and its successor agency, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). As a research pilot at NASA's Flight Research Center in Edwards, California, he was a project pilot on many pioneering high-speed aircraft. Armstrong transferred to astronaut status in 1962 and was assigned as command pilot for the Gemini 8 mission, which was launched on March 16, 1966. As spacecraft commander for Apollo 11, the first manned lunar landing mission, Armstrong gained the distinction of being the first man to land a craft on the moon and first to step on its surface. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: Om3101_3737076_007
Subjects: Science and Technology; Arts and Entertainment; Celebrations; Parades & processions; Hope, Bob, 1903-2003; Armstrong, Neil, 1930-2012; Flight; Aeronautics; Sabin, Albert B. (Albert Bruce), 1906-; Astronauts
Places: Wapakoneta (Ohio); Auglaize County (Ohio)
 
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Wildcat effigy pipe photograph  Save
Description: This pipe in effigy (a likeness or representation) of a wildcat was excavated from Tremper Mound, a Hopewell culture site located five miles north of Portsmouth in Scioto County. The cat crouches on platform with legs flexed. One ear projects from head. Some parts of the pipe have been restored. Made of olive-gray stone with black and brown mottling, the pipe measures approximately 1.67" x 1.45" x 3.5" (4.15 x 3.6 x 8.8 cm). This pipe is part of a large collection of pipes found at Tremper Mound. The pipes were carved of Ohio pipestone, a silica-based material that can be easily carved when freshly quarried from the hills east of the Scioto River. The pipes represent a variety of animals significant to the Hopewell, including owls, wolves, deer and beaver. Skilled Hopewell craftsmen carved the pipes with flint knives and some are embellished with pearls or copper. In Ohio, the Hopewell Indians (100 B.C.-A.D. 500) built burial mounds and large earthen enclosures in geometric shapes (circles, squares, and octagons) to mark the places where the people gathered periodically to participate in many social and ceremonial events. Some of these sites were quite large--the Newark Earthworks complex extends over a 4-square-mile area. The Hopewell people also maintained a large trade network extending as far as the Rocky Mountains of Wyoming, the Florida coast and Appalachians, and northern Lake Superior. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: Om1357_1764596_085
Subjects: American Indians in Ohio; Plants and Animals; Arts and Entertainment; Geography and Natural Resources; Hopewell culture; Mounds (Burials); Pipes (Smoking); Felidae
Places: Rush Township (Ohio); Scioto County (Ohio)
 
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Casper's pony and dog show photograph  Save
Description: Dated 1936, this photograph shows three ponies of Casper's Pony and Dog Show training for a routine. There are two dogs in cages and several dogs sitting to the left. This photograph is one of the many visual materials collected for use in the Ohio Guide. In 1935, President Franklin D. Roosevelt established the Works Progress Administration by executive order to create jobs for the large numbers of unemployed laborers, as well as artists, musicians, actors, and writers. The Federal Arts Program, a sector of the Works Progress Administration, included the Federal Writers’ Project, one of the primary goals of which was to complete the America Guide series, a series of guidebooks for each state which included state history, art, architecture, music, literature, and points of interest to the major cities and tours throughout the state. Work on the Ohio Guide began in 1935 with the publication of several pamphlets and brochures. The Reorganization Act of 1939 consolidated the Works Progress Administration and other agencies into the Federal Works Administration, and the Federal Writers’ Project became the Federal Writers’ Project in Ohio. The final product was published in 1940 and went through several editions. The Ohio Guide Collection consists of 4,769 photographs collected for use in Ohio Guide and other publications of the Federal Writers’ Project in Ohio from 1935-1939. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: SA1039AV_B12F12_015_001
Subjects: Ponies; Dogs; Circus animals; Arts and Entertainment; Federal Writers' Project
Places: Cincinnati (Ohio); Hamilton County (Ohio)
 
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Moonshine Festival photographs  Save
Description: Four 2" x 2" (5.08 x 5.08 cm) photographs document floats in the New Straitsville Moonshine Festival Parade in Perry County, Ohio. Held over Memorial Day weekend, the New Straitsville Moonshine Festival began in 1971. The year before, a homecoming celebration was held in honor of the town's centennial. The event was a success, and residents decided to hold the event every year. It was named the Moonshine Festival in honor of New Straitsville's history as a producer of bootleg moonshine during the Great Depression, when many of the region's coal mines were closed. The Moonshine Festival includes a parade, crowning of "Miss Moonshine," and the distilling of moonshine. While the sale of moonshine is illegal in Ohio, moonshine is made for demonstration purposes at the festival and later dumped. Moonshine is a type of whiskey distilled from corn mash (a mixture of corn, sugar, water, and yeast). The result is a high-proof whiskey, which was often made at night "by light of the moon" to avoid prosecution by law enforcement agencies. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: Om3113_3737134_003
Subjects: Arts and Entertainment; Parades & processions; Stills (Distilleries); Floats (Parades); Festivals; Alcoholic beverages
Places: New Straitsville (Ohio); Perry County (Ohio)
 
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Rock House formation photograph  Save
Description: Back reads: "Rock House State Park, Hocking Co." Hocking Hills State Park is known for its geologic features of Blackhand sandstone, including Old Man's Cave, Cedar Falls, and Rock House. The only true cave in the Hocking Hills region, Rock House is a corridor-like tunnel situated in a 150-foot Blackhand sandstone cliff. Rock House has been used by many different groups over the course of its history. Small recesses, called hominy holes, are believed to have been used by American Indians as baking ovens. According to local folklore, Rock House was also used as a hideout by robbers, murderers, and bootleggers, earning it the nickname Robbers' Roost. A sixteen room hotel, built in 1835 by Colonel F.F. Rempel of Logan, once stood where the picnic shelter is today. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: SA1039AV_B07F04_004_1
Subjects: Arts and Entertainment; Geography and Natural Resources; Rocks; Parks--Ohio--Pictorial works.; Recreation
Places: Hocking Hills State Park (Ohio); Hocking County (Ohio); South Logan (Ohio)
 
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293 matches on "arts entertainment"