2199 matches on "civil rights"
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Protest meeting poster  Save
Description: This flier calling for a protest meeting was issued by the Vanguard League, in hopes of uniting members of the organization and community against violence in Eastside Columbus restaurants. The Vanguard League was founded in May 1940 by members of the African American community in Columbus, Ohio. They were dedicated to using nonviolent direct action to solve problems of race relations in the city, and the League's original motto read, "For equality, opportunity, liberty, and democracy for Negroes." Some of the problems addressed by the Vanguard League included discrimination in hiring, fair housing, segregated schools, and community conduct. By publishing pamphlets, holding civil rights events, organizing pickets, and filing civil suits against discriminatory practices, among other methods, the group achieved numerous successes including the hiring of African American women at the Curtiss Wright plant, and the desegregation of many theaters in Columbus. In 1950 the Vanguard League became part of the Columbus chapter of the Congress of Racial Equality (C.O.R.E.), and former members of the Vanguard League continued to fight for civil rights in Columbus in many different capacities. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: MSS508_B01F06_001
Subjects: African American Ohioans; Civil rights; Race relations; Vanguard League (Columbus, Ohio); Civic organizations; Protests and protestors; Activism
Places: Columbus (Ohio); Franklin County (Ohio)
 
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William M. McCulloch photograph  Save
Description: William Moore McCulloch was a civil-rights activist and member of the United States House of Representatives from Ohio in the mid-twentieth century. He was instrumental in crafting and passing several key pieces of legislation in the 1960s to ensure equal rights for all Americans, including the 1964 Civil Rights Act, the 1965 Voting Rights Act, and the 1968 Fair Housing Act. William McCulloch was born near Holmesville, Ohio, in Holmes County, on November 24, 1901. He received an undergraduate degree from the College of Wooster. In 1925, McCulloch earned a law degree from The Ohio State University and was admitted to the Ohio bar. He practiced law for a period in Jacksonville, Florida, where he saw firsthand the unconstitutionality of segregation practices in the region. In 1928, McCulloch moved back to Ohio and established a law practice with George Barry in Piqua. McCulloch became active in politics. A member of the Republican Party, he was elected to the Ohio House of Representatives in 1932. During his tenure, McCulloch rose to important leadership positions, serving as House Minority Leader from 1936-1939, and as Speaker of the House from 1939-1944. He was the first House member to serve three consecutive terms as Speaker. A constitutional lawyer, McCulloch showed his passion for equal rights early in his career and supported the local NAACP chapter in its drive to end segregated seating in local restaurants. One of the earliest sit-ins in the area was held at the Union Bus Terminal lunch counter and marked the beginning of the end for segregated accommodations in the Piqua area. This was bold stance to take in a rural, white, middle-class, and conservative stronghold where the black population was a mere 2.7 percent at the time. During World War II, McCulloch served in the U.S. military from December 26, 1943 to October 12, 1945. At age 40 he resigned as Speaker of the House and enlisted in the U.S. Army, serving overseas in Europe. He resumed his political career after the war. In a special election held on November 4, 1947, voters of Ohio's 4th District elected McCulloch to represent them in the United States House of Representatives, filling a vacancy created by the resignation of Robert F. Jones. McCulloch went on to represent western Ohio in the House in twelve succeeding Congresses through January 3, 1973. He was popular and respected within his district, and his constituents reelected him by margins of 65 to 70 percent throughout his tenure. Although a political conservative, McCulloch is remembered as a champion of civil rights. Early in his tenure as Representative of Ohio’s 4th District, he played a key role in President Eisenhower’s 1957 and 1960 civil rights bills. As the ranking Republican member of the House Judiciary Committee in the early 1960s, he introduced civil rights legislation in the House, and his bipartisan support for the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was instrumental in the adoption of that legislation. McCulloch went on to play key roles in the 1965 Voting Rights Act and the 1968 Fair Housing Act. He fought another major battle in 1969-1970 by defending the renewal of certain temporary provisions in the 1965 Voting Rights Act during the Nixon administration. Directed at Southern states with a history of discriminatory voting practices, a strong provision in the legislation demanded that these states obtain clearance through the Justice Department before making any changes that would affect the voting process. He continued to champion equal rights and to protect the landmark legislation of the 1960s until his retirement in 1972. McCulloch died in Washington, D.C., on February 22, 1980. He is buried at Arlington National Cemetery. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: AL07025
Subjects: Legislators--Ohio; Ohio History--State and Local Government; Politicians; Ohio General Assembly House of Representatives; Civil rights; United States. Congress. House; Miami County (Ohio); Veterans
Places: Miami County (Ohio)
 
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Charles Harris Wesley, Ph.D. photograph  Save
Description: Photograph of Charles Harris Wesley, a prominent African American scholar, artist, minister and civil rights figure. He received degrees from Fisk University, Yale University and Harvard University and taught at Howard University in Washington. He was a minister of the African Methodist Episcopal Church and was awarded the Doctor of Divinity degree by Wilberforce University. He served as president of Wilberforce University in the 1940s, founded of Central State College in 1948 and served as the first director of the Afro-American Historical and Cultural Museum in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the 1970s. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: NAM_VFM34_1
Subjects: Activists; Civil Liberties; Civil rights; Civil rights movements--United States--History--20th century; African American men; African American authors; Wilberforce University; Howard University; Central State College
Places: Washington (District of Columbia); Philadelphia (Pennsylvania); Wilberforce (Ohio); Greene County (Ohio)
 
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Charles H. Wesley and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. photograph  Save
Description: Charles Harris Wesley shaking hands with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. shortly after receiving his honorary doctorate from Central State College in 1958. Charles Harris Wesley was a prominent African American scholar, artist, minister and civil rights figure. He received degrees from Fisk University, Yale University and Harvard University and taught at Howard University in Washington. He was a minister of the African Methodist Episcopal Church and was awarded the Doctor of Divinity degree by Wilberforce University. He served as president of Wilberforce University in the 1940s, founded of Central State College in 1948 and served as the first director of the Afro-American Historical and Cultural Museum in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the 1970s. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: NAM_VFM34_2_20.tif
Subjects: Activists; Civil Liberties; Civil rights; Civil rights movements--United States--History--20th century; African American men; African American authors; Wilberforce University; Howard University; Central State College
Places: Wilberforce (Ohio); Greene County (Ohio)
 
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Vanguard League "conduct card"  Save
Description: This "conduct card" was produced and distributed by members of the Vanguard League beginning around 1944. According to a September 9, 1944, article in The Ohio State News, the cards were to be "distributed by persons whenever they encounter unseemly conduct" and were available to pick up at League offices. The Vanguard League was founded in May 1940 by members of the African American community in Columbus, Ohio. They were dedicated to using nonviolent direct action to solve problems of race relations in the city, and the League's original motto read, "For equality, opportunity, liberty, and democracy for Negroes." Some of the problems addressed by the Vanguard League included discrimination in hiring, fair housing, segregated schools, and community conduct. By publishing pamphlets, holding civil rights events, organizing pickets, and filing civil suits against discriminatory practices, among other methods, the group achieved numerous successes including the hiring of African American women at the Curtiss Wright plant, and the desegregation of many theaters in Columbus. In 1950 the Vanguard League became part of the Columbus chapter of the Congress of Racial Equality (C.O.R.E.), and former members of the Vanguard League continued to fight for civil rights in Columbus in many different capacities. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: MSS508_B01F07_002
Subjects: African American Ohioans; Civil rights; Race relations; Vanguard League (Columbus, Ohio); Civic organizations; Activism
Places: Columbus (Ohio); Franklin County (Ohio)
 
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Vanguard League dinner photograph  Save
Description: Members of the Vanguard League dining together, ca. 1940-1950. Seen on the right nearest to the camera is attorney Frank Shearer, who served as president of the Vanguard League and was one of its founding members. The Vanguard League was founded in May 1940 by members of the African American community in Columbus, Ohio. They were dedicated to using nonviolent direct action to solve problems of race relations in the city, and the League's original motto read, "For equality, opportunity, liberty, and democracy for Negroes." Some of the problems addressed by the Vanguard League included discrimination in hiring, fair housing, segregated schools, and community conduct. By publishing pamphlets, holding civil rights events, organizing pickets, and filing civil suits against discriminatory practices, among other methods, the group achieved numerous successes including the hiring of African American women at the Curtiss Wright plant, and the desegregation of many theaters in Columbus. In 1950 the Vanguard League became part of the Columbus chapter of the Congress of Racial Equality (C.O.R.E.), and former members of the Vanguard League continued to fight for civil rights in Columbus in many different capacities. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: MSS508_B01F07_001
Subjects: African American Ohioans; Civil rights; Race relations; Vanguard League (Columbus, Ohio); Civic organizations; Discrimination; Activism
Places: Columbus (Ohio); Franklin County (Ohio)
 
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Cincinnati police officers arresting a rioter  Save
Description: This photograph depicts two police officers arresting a black man in Cincinnati, Ohio. Rioting erupted in the Avondale section of Cincinnati, Ohio, on April 8, 1968, five days after the assassination of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The rioting was set off by an accidental shooting in which a man named James Smith, armed with a shotgun, was trying to protect his property from looters. A person approached Smith and grabbed the barrel of the shotgun, causing the gun to accidentally fire, killing Smith's wife. A rumor spread that "a white policeman had shot a colored woman," according to the Cincinnati Enquirer, April 9, 1968. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: AL06906
Subjects: Riot control; Ohio History -- State and Local Government; Civil rights movements--United States--History--20th century; Ohio History -- Slavery, Anti-Slavery and Civil Rights
Places: Cincinnati (Ohio); Hamilton County (Ohio)
 
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Harry C. Smith portrait  Save
Description: Portrait of Harry C. Smith (1863-1941), a representative from Cuyahoga County, from his term in the 71st session of the Ohio House of Representatives, 1894-1895. He also served in the 72nd session, 1896-1897, and 74th session, 1900-1901. During his time in office, Smith lobbied the state government to do more to protect the civil rights of African Americans, including gaining passage of the Smith Act in the Ohio House of Representatives. The act was one of the strictest anti-lynching laws in the U.S. at the time. Smith was also a journalist and publisher, and was co-founder of the Cleveland Gazette. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: AL03899
Subjects: Cuyahoga County (Ohio); African Americans -- Ohio; Civil rights activists; Journalists
Places: Columbus (Ohio); Franklin County (Ohio)
 
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Anna Arnold Hedgeman photograph  Save
Description: Photograph of Anna Arnold Hedgeman. Anna Arnold Hedgeman was a prominent figure in civil rights, women's rights and education in the 20th century. She taught at Rust College in Holly Springs, Mississippi after graduating as the first African American woman to earn a degree from Hamline University in St. Paul, Minnesota. Hedgeman was the first African American woman to serve on the cabinet of a New York mayor in the 1950s and in 1963 she helped A. Philip Randolph and Bayard Rustin plan the March on Washington. She held honorary doctorates from both Howard University and Hamline University, was an executive of the YWCA and was the author of two books: "The Trumpet Sounds" and "The Gift Of Chaos." View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: NAM_MSS15_B05F01_05
Subjects: African American women; African American authors; African American Educators; Historical Black Colleges and Universities; Politicians; Civil rights; Howard University; Activists
 
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Anna Arnold Hedgeman and Asa Philip Randolph photograph  Save
Description: Photograph of Anna Arnold Hedgeman and Asa Philip Randolph planning the route for the March on Washington in 1963. Anna Arnold Hedgeman was a prominent figure in civil rights, women's rights and education in the 20th century. She taught at Rust College in Holly Springs, Mississippi after graduating as the first African American woman to earn a degree from Hamline University in St. Paul, Minnesota. Hedgeman was the first African American woman to serve on the cabinet of a New York mayor in the 1950s and in 1963 she helped A. Philip Randolph and Bayard Rustin plan the March on Washington. She held honorary doctorates from both Howard University and Hamline University, was an executive of the YWCA and was the author of two books: "The Trumpet Sounds" and "The Gift Of Chaos." View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: NAM_MSS15_B05F02_01
Subjects: African American women; African American authors; African American Educators; Historical Black Colleges and Universities; Politicians; Civil rights; Howard University; Activists
 
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Anna Arnold Hedgeman and Asa Philip Randolph photograph  Save
Description: Photograph of Anna Arnold Hedgeman giving a speech with Asa Philip Randolph at the 50th Anniversary Celebration of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters. Anna Arnold Hedgeman was a prominent figure in civil rights, women's rights and education in the 20th century. She taught at Rust College in Holly Springs, Mississippi after graduating as the first African American woman to earn a degree from Hamline University in St. Paul, Minnesota. Hedgeman was the first African American woman to serve on the cabinet of a New York mayor in the 1950s and in 1963 she helped A. Philip Randolph and Bayard Rustin plan the March on Washington. She held honorary doctorates from both Howard University and Hamline University, was an executive of the YWCA and was the author of two books: "The Trumpet Sounds" and "The Gift Of Chaos." View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: NAM_MSS15_B05F02_02
Subjects: African American women; African American authors; African American Educators; Historical Black Colleges and Universities; Politicians; Civil rights; Howard University; Activists
 
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Anna Arnold Hedgeman, Asa Philip Randolph and Percy Sutton photograph  Save
Description: Photograph of Anna Arnold Hedgeman, Asa Philip Randolph and Percy Sutton attending a luncheon at the Hotel Commodore in London in celebration of the 50th Anniversary of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters. Anna Arnold Hedgeman was a prominent figure in civil rights, women's rights and education in the 20th century. She taught at Rust College in Holly Springs, Mississippi after graduating as the first African American woman to earn a degree from Hamline University in St. Paul, Minnesota. Hedgeman was the first African American woman to serve on the cabinet of a New York mayor in the 1950s and in 1963 she helped A. Philip Randolph and Bayard Rustin plan the March on Washington. She held honorary doctorates from both Howard University and Hamline University, was an executive of the YWCA and was the author of two books: "The Trumpet Sounds" and "The Gift Of Chaos." View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: NAM_MSS15_B05F02_03_2
Subjects: African American women; African American authors; African American Educators; Historical Black Colleges and Universities; African American men; Politicians; Civil rights; Howard University; Activists
 
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2199 matches on "civil rights"