586 matches on "education*"
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Marietta College photograph  Save
Description: A photograph of Marietta College's campus in Washington County. Marietta College is one of Ohio's oldest continually operating institutions of higher education. In 1830, the Reverend Luther Bingham established the Institute for Education. Bingham was a pastor in the Congregationalist Church and sought to educate others in his church's beliefs. Unfortunately for Bingham, his school failed financially in 1832. Local citizens in Marietta then created the Marietta Collegiate Institute and Western Teachers' Seminary, a non-denominational institution. In 1835, this college became known simply as Marietta College. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: AL06540.tif
Subjects: Marietta (Ohio); Universities and colleges Ohio; Education, Higher--Ohio--History
Places: Marietta (Ohio); Washington County (Ohio)
 
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Andrews Institute photograph  Save
Description: Dated ca. 1930-1939, this photograph shows the Andrews Institute in Willoughby, Ohio. The Andrews School for Girls was founded by Margaret St. John Andrews and her husband Wallace C. Andrews to provide girls with the opportunity for an affordable secondary vocational education. It first opened in 1910 at the home of Dr. O.S. St. John, but later moved to its present location with the Willoughby School of Fine Arts in 1923. This photograph is one of the many visual materials collected for use in the Ohio Guide. In 1935, President Franklin D. Roosevelt established the Works Progress Administration by executive order to create jobs for the large numbers of unemployed laborers, as well as artists, musicians, actors, and writers. The Federal Arts Program, a sector of the Works Progress Administration, included the Federal Writers’ Project, one of the primary goals of which was to complete the America Guide series, a series of guidebooks for each state which included state history, art, architecture, music, literature, and points of interest to the major cities and tours throughout the state. Work on the Ohio Guide began in 1935 with the publication of several pamphlets and brochures. The Reorganization Act of 1939 consolidated the Works Progress Administration and other agencies into the Federal Works Administration, and the Federal Writers’ Project became the Federal Writers’ Project in Ohio. The final product was published in 1940 and went through several editions. The Ohio Guide Collection consists of 4,769 photographs collected for use in Ohio Guide and other publications of the Federal Writers’ Project in Ohio from 1935-1939. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: index.cpd
Subjects: Architecture; Education; Education, Secondary; Girls' schools; Andrews School for Girls (Willoughby, Ohio)
Places: Willoughby (Ohio); Lake County (Ohio)
 
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Antioch College illustration  Save
Description: Color illustration of the historic Antioch Hall at Antioch College, taken from "Gleason's Pictorial Drawing-Room Companion," ca. 1852-1854. Antioch College was founded in Yellow Springs, Ohio, by the Christian Church in 1852. Antioch's first president was Horace Mann, a nationally-known expert on education in the nineteenth century. Although the Christian Church was instrumental in the college's start, Antioch soon became known for providing a nonsectarian education, and was one of the first co-educational institutions of higher education. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: AL04095.tif
Subjects: Education -- Ohio; College buildings; Universities and colleges
Places: Yellow Springs (Ohio); Greene County (Ohio)
 
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Wilberforce University, Bundy Hall, photograph  Save
Description: This photograph is an exterior view of Bundy Hall, C. N. & I. Wilberforce University, designed by noted Columbus architect Frank Packard (1866-1923) and erected in 1917. ("C. N. & I." refers to "Combined Normal and Industrial.") The building was used for administration offices, classrooms, and storerooms. This image is part of the data gathered from an inventory of physical properties owned by the state. The inventory was conducted by the Ohio Department of Finance in 1931. In 1856, the Methodist Episcopal Church established Wilberforce University near Xenia, Ohio, to provide African American access to a college education. The university was the first private black college in the United States. Its founders named the institution after William Wilberforce, a prominent eighteenth-century abolitionist. A number of African-American Ohioans attended the school during its early years. During the American Civil War, attendance declined as many students enlisted in the Union army. Wilberforce University closed in 1862. In 1863, the African Methodist Episcopal Church acquired ownership of the university. Under the direction of Daniel Payne, a bishop in the African Methodist Episcopal Church, John Mitchell, the principal of a school in Cincinnati, and James Shorter, an African Methodist Episcopal pastor from Zanesville, Ohio, Wilberforce reopened its doors. The institution operated as a private university serving the African-American community for the next twenty-four years. In 1887, the State of Ohio began to provide Wilberforce with funds to help finance the institution, brought to an end the university's exclusively private status. The state also helped the university create a Normal and Industrial Department that eventually evolved into Central State University. Wilberforce University has experienced steady growth throughout the twentieth century. During the last decades of the twentieth century, the institution built a new residence hall, a student health center, a recreation and sports facility, and an administrative center. The university offers more than twenty degree programs and has exchange programs with universities around the world. In 2003, enrollment was more than 1,200 students. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: AL05850.tif
Subjects: Cultural Ohio -- Education; Wilberforce University; College buildings; Historical Black Colleges and Universities; Education, Higher--Ohio--History; Xenia (Ohio)
Places: Wilberforce (Ohio); Greene County (Ohio)
 
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Wilberforce University, Mitchell Hall, photograph  Save
Description: This photograph shows S.T. Mitchell Hall, C. N. & I. Wilberforce University, a structure designed by Frank Packard and erected in 1912. (C.N.&I. refers to "Combined Normal and Industrial" department.) As seen in this photo, Mitchell Hall is a three-story building situated on an expanse of lawn with a few young trees. The building was used as a residence hall for 75 girls, an office, a kitchen and dining room, and a small laundry. Six employees lived on the premises. This image is part of the data gathered from an inventory of physical properties owned by the state, ca. 1931. The inventory was conducted by the Ohio Department of Finance in 1931. In 1856, the Methodist Episcopal Church established Wilberforce University near Xenia, Ohio, to provide African American access to a college education. The university was the first private black college in the United States. Its founders named the institution after William Wilberforce, a prominent eighteenth-century abolitionist. A number of African-American Ohioans attended the school during its early years. During the American Civil War, attendance declined as many students enlisted in the Union army. Wilberforce University closed in 1862. In 1863, the African Methodist Episcopal Church acquired ownership of the university. Under the direction of Daniel Payne, a bishop in the African Methodist Episcopal Church, John Mitchell, the principal of a school in Cincinnati, and James Shorter, an African Methodist Episcopal pastor from Zanesville, Ohio, Wilberforce reopened its doors. The institution operated as a private university serving the African-American community for the next twenty-four years. In 1887, the State of Ohio began to provide Wilberforce with funds to help finance the institution, brought to an end the university's exclusively private status. The state also helped the university create a Normal and Industrial Department that eventually evolved into Central State University. Wilberforce University has experienced steady growth throughout the twentieth century. During the last decades of the twentieth century, the institution built a new residence hall, a student health center, a recreation and sports facility, and an administrative center. The university offers more than twenty degree programs and has exchange programs with universities around the world. In 2003, enrollment was more than 1,200 students. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: AL05851.tif
Subjects: Cultural Ohio -- Education; Wilberforce University; Historical Black Colleges and Universities; Education, Higher--Ohio--History; Historic buildings--Ohio--Columbus--Pictorial works; Xenia (Ohio)
Places: Wilberforce (Ohio); Greene County (Ohio)
 
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School for the Blind Braille Rallye photograph  Save
Description: This color image is a closeup of a paper sign taped to the door of a blue car. The sign reads: "Ohio State School for the Blind / 20 / Braille Rallye." A Braille Rallye is a competitive event in which a blind or visually impaired navigator is paired with a sighted driver. Driving directions and descriptions of landmarks are written in Braille, which the navigator reads and then imparts to the driver as they proceed along the course. Results of the competition are based on navigation and timekeeping. In 1835 Dr. William Awl of Columbus and Dr. Daniel Drake of Cincinnati recommended to the Ohio General Assembly that a residential school for the blind be established. On April 3, 1837, Ohio governor Duncan McArthur signed the legislation that created the nation's first public school for the blind. The Ohio Institution for the Education of the Blind opened on July 3, 1837, with five students. It was the predecessor of the Ohio State School for the Blind. Any blind children residing in Ohio could attend the institution, which was located in downtown Columbus. The school initially had a maximum capacity of sixty students, but upon moving to a new building in 1874, more than three hundred students could attend at one time. Between 1839 and 1901, 2,058 students enrolled at the Ohio Institution for the Education of the Blind, with 339 attending in 1901 alone. In the early 1900s the Ohio Institution for the Education of the Blind became known as the Ohio State School for the Blind, and the Ohio Department of Education assumed control of the school. In 1953 the school moved ten miles north of its original location to its present home at 5220 North High Street. In 2005, 126 students enrolled in the Ohio State School for the Blind. Students as young as three and as old as twenty-one years of age attended the school. Students could receive their entire education, kindergarten through high school, at the institution. In addition, the Ohio State School for the Blind offered vocational training for its students. William Awl (1799-1876) was born in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. He studied medicine at the Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia and, in 1825, established a practice in Lancaster, Ohio. As a physician, Awl sought to improve medical care for the imprisoned, the blind, and the mentally ill. In 1833, the Ohio legislature appointed Awl as the physician of the Ohio Penitentiary. Two years later Awl helped organize the Ohio Medical Association. This organization lobbied the Ohio legislature to establish a state hospital for the mentally ill and a school for the blind. In 1837, they succeeded in convincing the legislature to establish the Ohio Lunatic Asylum. Awl served as the director of this institution until 1850. He believed that mental health problems were illnesses that physicians could treat. In 1868 he became the physician for the Ohio Institution for the Blind. Daniel Drake (1785-1852) was in New Jersey. His family was very poor and moved to Kentucky in 1788, hoping to improve its lot on the frontier. In 1798, Drake became a student of Dr. William Goforth, one of the first physicians in Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1805 he received the first medical diploma granted west of the Appalachian Mountains. Drake played a major role in establishing the Medical College of Ohio, founded in 1819. He also helped create the Commercial Hospital and Lunatic Asylum for the State of Ohio in 1820. Drake contributed greatly to Ohio's development. His work helped provide Ohioans with capable doctors. He played a leading role in establishing several institutions of higher education. Drake also wrote numerous books on Ohio's animals, plants, and diseases. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: AL06955.tif
Subjects: Ohio State School for the Blind; Blind--Education--United States; Awl, William M. (William Maclay), 1799-1876; Drake, Daniel, 1785-1852; Ohio Institution for the Education of the Blind
Places: Columbus (Ohio); Franklin County (Ohio)
 
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John Mercer Langston photograph  Save
Description: This 5 by 7-inch (13 by 18 cm) photograph is a portrait of John Mercer Langston, an African American lawyer, educational administrator, and congressman. He was born in 1829 in Virginia, the son of a wealthy white planter and an emancipated slave. His parents died in 1834, leaving Langston a sizeable inheritance. Langston moved to Ohio, living first in Marietta, and then in Cincinnati. He attended Oberlin College, graduating in 1849. Although he was prohibited from attending law school because of his race, Langston read law and became the first African American lawyer in Ohio, passing the bar in 1854. He settled in Brownhelm, Ohio, where he was elected town clerk, becoming one of the country's first African American elected officials. Not long after, he moved to Oberlin, where he served on city council and the board of education. During his long career Langston explored many interests, including law, politics, public service, and education. He was a leader in the anti-slavery and African American rights movements, and was also sympathetic to the temperance and women's rights causes. During the Civil War he helped recruit African Americans to serve in Ohio regiments. He died in 1897. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: Om1277_781386_111.tif
Subjects: African American Ohioans; Ohio Government; Lawyers; Elected officials; Civil War; Education; Langston, John Mercer, 1829-1897
Places: Lorain County (Ohio); Brownhelm (Ohio); Oberlin (Ohio)
 
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Marietta College drawing  Save
Description: Print showing campus buildings at Marietta College, from "Historical Collections of Ohio" by Henry Howe, 1847. Marietta College was established by Ohio's Congregationalists in 1835 and is one of Ohio's oldest continually-operating institutions of higher education. It was originally known as the Marietta Collegiate Institute and Western Teachers' Seminary, View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: AL03999.tif
Subjects: Education -- Ohio; Cultural Ohio -- Education; Art, American--Ohio; Universities and colleges--Pictorial works
Places: Marietta (Ohio); Washington County (Ohio)
 
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Finishing board of education poster  Save
Description: Reverse reads: "Montgomery County,Dayton,O. Mar. 3,1937 PUBLIC FORUM, B of E BLDG. Finishing a Poster 4x5 F.L.Neg. I-8x10 print for Publicity" This is a photo of an artist finishing a poster to promote a public forum for the Dayton Board of Education. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: SA1039AV_B10F09_027_001.tif
Subjects: Boards of education; Posters
Places: Dayton (Ohio); Montgomery County (Ohio)
 
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Horace Mann Memorial photograph  Save
Description: Dated April 26, 1937, this photograph shows the Horace Mann Memorial at Glen Helen Nature Preserve in Yellow Springs, Ohio, in Greene County, with a caption which reads "Greene Co., Yellow Springs, O. April 26, 1937. Horace Mann Memorial." Horace Mann was the first president of Antioch College and held the office until his death in 1859. Antioch College was founded in 1852 as the first nonsectarian, co-educational institution in the nation to offer the same educational opportunities to both men and women. It was also among the first to offer equal educational opportunities to African Americans. The memorial reads "Horace Mann. 1796 - 1859. First President and Founder of Antioch College. This memorial is erected to perpetuate the memory of an able lawyer, a great statesman and a pioneer in education. May his life and example ever inspire and exalt the students of Antioch College. Hugh Taylor Birch, Donor - 1936." This photograph is one of the many visual materials collected for use in the Ohio Guide. In 1935, President Franklin D. Roosevelt established the Works Progress Administration by executive order to create jobs for the large numbers of unemployed laborers, as well as artists, musicians, actors, and writers. The Federal Arts Program, a sector of the Works Progress Administration, included the Federal Writers’ Project, one of the primary goals of which was to complete the America Guide series, a series of guidebooks for each state which included state history, art, architecture, music, literature, and points of interest to the major cities and tours throughout the state. Work on the Ohio Guide began in 1935 with the publication of several pamphlets and brochures. The Reorganization Act of 1939 consolidated the Works Progress Administration and other agencies into the Federal Works Administration, and the Federal Writers’ Project became the Federal Writers’ Project in Ohio. The final product was published in 1940 and went through several editions. The Ohio Guide Collection consists of 4,769 photographs collected for use in Ohio Guide and other publications of the Federal Writers’ Project in Ohio from 1935-1939. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: index.cpd
Subjects: Education; Universities and colleges; Statues; Mann, Horace, 1796-1859; College campuses; Ohio--History--Pictorial works; Federal Writers' Project
Places: Yellow Springs (Ohio); Greene County (Ohio)
 
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William Holmes McGuffey portrait  Save
Description: This is a photographic reproduction of an engraved portrait depicting William Holmes McGuffey. McGuffey, who was from Tuscarawas County, Ohio, was a professor at Miami University from 1826 to 1836. Between 1836 and 1845 he served as president of three Ohio institutions: Cincinnati College, Ohio University and Woodward College in Cincinnati. In 1845 McGuffey became a professor at the University of Virginia, where he taught until his death in 1873. He is best known as the author of the popular series of children's textbooks called McGuffey Readers. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: AL03317.tif
Subjects: Authors, American -- Ohio; Education, Higher--Ohio--History; McGuffey readers; University presidents
Places: Tuscarawas County (Ohio)
 
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Miami University print  Save
Description: Founded in 1809, Miami University is one of the oldest and best-known universities in the State of Ohio. Located in Oxford, Ohio, it was named after the Miami Indians who once resided in the state. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: AL04010.tif
Subjects: Miami University; Cultural Ohio -- Education; Art, American--Ohio; Education, Higher--Ohio--History; Universities and colleges--Pictorial works
Places: Oxford (Ohio); Butler County (Ohio)
 
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586 matches on "education*"