634 matches on "indian*"
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Treaty of Greeneville facsimile  Save
Description: Reverse reads "Darke Co., Greenville, O., March 25, 1938. Facsimile of Wayne's Treaty (also see #28 and #29) On August 20, 1794, an American army commanded by Anthony Wayne defeated a Native American force led by Blue Jacket of the Shawnee at the Battle of Fallen Timbers. With this victory, Indians living in the western portion of modern-day Ohio knew that they had to sue for peace. In January 1795, representatives from the various tribes met with Wayne at Fort Greene Ville. The Americans and natives spent the next eight months negotiating a treaty. It became known as the Treaty of Greeneville. On August 3, 1795, leaders of the Wyandot Indians, the Delaware Indians, the Shawnee Indians, the Ottawa Indians, the Miami Indians, the Eel River Indians, the Wea Indians, the Chippewa Indians, the Potawatomi Indians, the Kickapoo Indians, the Piankashaw Indians, and the Kaskaskia Indians formally signed the treaty. The natives agreed to relinquish all claims to land south and east of a boundary that began roughly at the mouth of the Cuyahoga River. It ran southward to Fort Laurens and then turned westward to Fort Loramie and Fort Recovery. It then turned southward to the Ohio River. The Indians, however, could still hunt on the land that they ceded. The whites agreed to relinquish their claims to land north and west of the line, although the natives permitted the Americans to establish several trading posts in their territory. The United States also provided the Indians with $20,000 worth of goods for signing the treaty. The American government also agreed to give the natives $9,500 every year in goods. The Indians were to decide how the goods would be divided among them. Many Indians refused to honor the agreement. White settlers continued to move onto the contested land. Violence continued between these two peoples. Native American leaders like Tecumseh and the Prophet would emerge in the early 1800s to carry on the Indian struggle to regain their lost land. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: SA1039AV_B01F05_002_001.tif
Subjects: Ohio Government; Military Ohio; American Indians in Ohio; Northwest Territory; Treaties; Treaty of Greenville
Places: Greenville (Ohio); Darke County (Ohio)
 
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Treaty of Greeneville facsimile  Save
Description: Photographic copy of the Treaty of Greeneville, signed August 3, 1795, at Fort Greene Ville (the present site of Greenville, Ohio). On August 20, 1794, an American army commanded by Anthony Wayne defeated a Native American force led by Blue Jacket of the Shawnee at the Battle of Fallen Timbers. With this victory, Indians living in the western portion of modern-day Ohio knew that they had to sue for peace. In January 1795, representatives from the various tribes met with Wayne at Fort Greene Ville. The Americans and natives spent the next eight months negotiating a treaty. It became known as the Treaty of Greeneville. On August 3, 1795, leaders of the Wyandot Indians, the Delaware Indians, the Shawnee Indians, the Ottawa Indians, the Miami Indians, the Eel River Indians, the Wea Indians, the Chippewa Indians, the Potawatomi Indians, the Kickapoo Indians, the Piankashaw Indians, and the Kaskaskia Indians formally signed the treaty. The natives agreed to relinquish all claims to land south and east of a boundary that began roughly at the mouth of the Cuyahoga River. It ran southward to Fort Laurens and then turned westward to Fort Loramie and Fort Recovery. It then turned southward to the Ohio River. The Indians, however, could still hunt on the land that they ceded. The whites agreed to relinquish their claims to land north and west of the line, although the natives permitted the Americans to establish several trading posts in their territory. The United States also provided the Indians with $20,000 worth of goods for signing the treaty. The American government also agreed to give the natives $9,500 every year in goods. The Indians were to decide how the goods would be divided among them. Many Indians refused to honor the agreement. White settlers continued to move onto the contested land. Violence continued between these two peoples. Native American leaders like Tecumseh and the Prophet would emerge in the early 1800s to carry on the Indian struggle to regain their lost land. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: SA1039AV_B01F05_003
Subjects: Ohio Government; Military Ohio; American Indians in Ohio; Northwest Territory; Treaties; Treaty of Greenville
Places: Greenville (Ohio); Darke County (Ohio)
 
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Treaty of Greeneville facsimile  Save
Description: Photographic copy of the Treaty of Greeneville, signed August 3, 1795, at Fort Greene Ville (the present site of Greenville, Ohio). On August 20, 1794, an American army commanded by Anthony Wayne defeated a Native American force led by Blue Jacket of the Shawnee at the Battle of Fallen Timbers. With this victory, Indians living in the western portion of modern-day Ohio knew that they had to sue for peace. In January 1795, representatives from the various tribes met with Wayne at Fort Greene Ville. The Americans and natives spent the next eight months negotiating a treaty. It became known as the Treaty of Greeneville. On August 3, 1795, leaders of the Wyandot Indians, the Delaware Indians, the Shawnee Indians, the Ottawa Indians, the Miami Indians, the Eel River Indians, the Wea Indians, the Chippewa Indians, the Potawatomi Indians, the Kickapoo Indians, the Piankashaw Indians, and the Kaskaskia Indians formally signed the treaty. The natives agreed to relinquish all claims to land south and east of a boundary that began roughly at the mouth of the Cuyahoga River. It ran southward to Fort Laurens and then turned westward to Fort Loramie and Fort Recovery. It then turned southward to the Ohio River. The Indians, however, could still hunt on the land that they ceded. The whites agreed to relinquish their claims to land north and west of the line, although the natives permitted the Americans to establish several trading posts in their territory. The United States also provided the Indians with $20,000 worth of goods for signing the treaty. The American government also agreed to give the natives $9,500 every year in goods. The Indians were to decide how the goods would be divided among them. Many Indians refused to honor the agreement. White settlers continued to move onto the contested land. Violence continued between these two peoples. Native American leaders like Tecumseh and the Prophet would emerge in the early 1800s to carry on the Indian struggle to regain their lost land. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: SA1039AV_B01F05_011
Subjects: Ohio Government; Military Ohio; American Indians in Ohio; Northwest Territory; Treaties; Treaty of Greenville
Places: Greenville (Ohio); Darke County (Ohio)
 
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Treaty of Greeneville  Save
Description: On August 20, 1794, an American army commanded by Anthony Wayne defeated a Native American force led by Blue Jacket of the Shawnee at the Battle of Fallen Timbers. With this victory, Indians living in the western portion of modern-day Ohio knew that they had to sue for peace. In January 1795, representatives from the various tribes met with Wayne at Fort Greene Ville. The Americans and natives spent the next eight months negotiating a treaty. It became known as the Treaty of Greeneville. On August 3, 1795, leaders of the Wyandot Indians, the Delaware Indians, the Shawnee Indians, the Ottawa Indians, the Miami Indians, the Eel River Indians, the Wea Indians, the Chippewa Indians, the Potawatomi Indians, the Kickapoo Indians, the Piankashaw Indians, and the Kaskaskia Indians formally signed the treaty. The natives agreed to relinquish all claims to land south and east of a boundary that began roughly at the mouth of the Cuyahoga River. It ran southward to Fort Laurens and then turned westward to Fort Loramie and Fort Recovery. It then turned southward to the Ohio River. The Indians, however, could still hunt on the land that they ceded. The whites agreed to relinquish their claims to land north and west of the line, although the natives permitted the Americans to establish several trading posts in their territory. The United States also provided the Indians with $20,000 worth of goods for signing the treaty. The American government also agreed to give the natives $9,500 every year in goods. The Indians were to decide how the goods would be divided among them. Many Indians refused to honor the agreement. White settlers continued to move onto the contested land. Violence continued between these two peoples. Native American leaders like Tecumseh and the Prophet would emerge in the early 1800s to carry on the Indian struggle to regain their lost land. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: SA1039AV_B01F05_016
Subjects: Ohio Government; Military Ohio; American Indians in Ohio; Northwest Territory; Treaties; Treaty of Greenville; Forts and fortifications
Places: Greenville (Ohio); Darke County (Ohio)
 
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'Death of Richard Butler' drawing  Save
Description: This black-and-white illustration portrays the death of Richard Butler (1743-1791), frontiersman and military leader, on November 4, 1791, during St. Clair’s Defeat (also known as the Battle of the Wabash). The uniformed Butler is reclining against a tree, his right hand raised in supplication or in self-defense, as a Native American man armed with a tomahawk approaches. Butler was born in Dublin, Ireland, and at age five came to North America with his father. They settled in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Richard Butler had a long career in the military. He was an ensign in Bouquet's Expedition in 1764 and an officer in the Continental Army during the American Revolution. He participated in the Battle of Saratoga and eventually attained the rank of brigadier-general. In 1783 the Confederation Congress appointed him to be an Indian commissioner. He helped to negotiate a treaty with the Iroquois Indians, determining their western boundary with the United States. In 1785 the Confederation Congress sent George Rogers Clark, Arthur Lee, and Butler to the Ohio Country to negotiate a treaty with the Delaware Indians, the Wyandot Indians, the Ottawa Indians, and the Chippewa Indians. The treaty negotiations took place at Fort McIntosh. Most of the Indian representatives were younger chiefs who did not have the legal authority to negotiate a treaty. Despite this, the American commissioners pressed for a treaty. After several weeks of negotiations and the consumption of a lot of alcohol provided by the Americans, the Native Americans signed the Treaty of Fort McIntosh on January 21, 1785. The tribal leaders agreed that they lived under the American government and could not form alliances with any other powers. The Indians were forced to relinquish their lands in southern and eastern Ohio. They were confined to the western corner of modern-day Ohio. Many natives rejected the treaty. The Shawnee Indians were especially opposed to the treaty because they lost claim to all of their lands in southwestern Ohio. Later that year, the Confederation Congress sent Butler and Samuel Holden Parsons to negotiate a new treaty with the Shawnees. The negotiations took place at Fort Finney (near what is now Cincinnati, Ohio). The Shawnees refused to give up their land. Butler and Parsons threatened them with attack. Shawnee chiefs, fearing the power of the American military, agreed to the Treaty of Fort Finney on February 1, 1786. The Shawnees agreed to relinquish all claims to their land in southwestern Ohio and southern Indiana. They would move to the land set aside for them in the Treaty of Fort McIntosh. The Americans also promised to keep white squatters from settling on land reserved exclusively for the Indians. Butler spent the remainder of the 1780s as the superintendent of Indian affairs for the Northern District of America. He also served in the Pennsylvania legislature. Butler was severely wounded during St. Clair's Defeat, a major confrontation between U.S. military and Native Americans. The American soldiers fled the battlefield, leaving Butler behind. He was killed by a tomahawk blow to the head. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: AL06995.tif
Subjects: Butler, Richard, 1743-1791; Kekionga, Battle of, Ohio, 1791; American Revolutionary War, 1775-1783; American Indians--Warfare
 
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John Thomas photograph  Save
Description: John Thomas (d. 1913) was a Quaker and Underground Railroad station-keeper of Azalia, Bartholomew County, Indiana. This is a cabinet card from photographers Friedgen and Donner in Columbus, Indiana. The image was collected by Ohio State University professor Wilbur H. Siebert (1866-1961). Siebert began researching the Underground Railroad in the 1890s as a way to interest his students in history. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: AL03003.tif
Subjects: Underground Railroad -- Indiana; Siebert, Wilbur Henry, 1866-1961; Abolitionists--Indiana--History; Friedgen & Donner
Places: Azalia (Indiana); Bartholomew County (Indiana)
 
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Levi Coffin home photograph  Save
Description: Photomechanical reproduction of Levi Coffin's home that was located in Fountain City, Wayne County, Indiana, and served as a stop on the Underground Railroad. Levi Coffin (1798-1877) and his wife Catharine (1803-1881) were reputed to have harbored more than two thousand slaves from the fall of 1826 to 1846. Coffin was even referred to as the "President of the Underground Railroad." Coffin later moved to Cincinnati, Ohio where he continued to offer his home as an Underground Railroad stop. The person in the photograph is not identified. The image was collected by Ohio State University professor Wilbur H. Siebert (1866-1961). Siebert began researching the Underground Railroad in the 1890s as a way to interest his students in history. On the photograph written in the left hand corner is: "MARetts Prep" Next to the figure in photograph is written: "Under Ground Railway Hotel. Fountain City Ind [Indiana]" Next to the tree in the photograph is written: "Built 1839" The sign on the building reads: "HOTEL" View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: AL03010.tif
Subjects: Siebert, Wilbur Henry, 1866-1961; Coffin, Levi, 1798-1877; Underground Railroad -- Indiana
Places: Fountain City (Indiana); Wayne County (Indiana)
 
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Treaty of Greeneville facsimile  Save
Description: Caption reads: " Facsimile of Wayne's Treaty." Photographic copy of the Treaty of Greeneville, signed August 3, 1795, at Fort Greene Ville (the present site of Greenville, Ohio). As a result of the treaty, which was negotiated by General Anthony Wayne, representatives from the Miami Indians, the Wyandot Indians, the Shawnee Indians, the Delaware Indians, and several other tribes agreed to move to the northwestern part of what is present-day Ohio. In doing so, they left behind their lands south and east of the agreed upon boundary. Not all Indians concurred with the treaty, and bloodshed continued in the region for the next twenty years as Americans and Indians struggled for control. View on Ohio Memory.
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Subjects: Ohio Government; Military Ohio; American Indians in Ohio; Northwest Territory; Treaties; Treaty of Greenville
Places: Greenville (Ohio); Darke County (Ohio)
 
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Rhoda Hadley portrait  Save
Description: Photographic reproduction of a portrait depicting Rhoda Hadley (1805-1892), ca. 1850-1875. She kept a station on the Underground Railroad with her husband, Alfred Hadley, in Bloomingdale, Parke County, Indiana. The image was collected by Ohio State University professor Wilbur H. Siebert (1866-1961). Siebert began researching the Underground Railroad in the 1890s as a way to interest his students in history. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: AL03005.tif
Subjects: Siebert, Wilbur Henry, 1866-1961; Underground Railroad -- Indiana; Abolitionists--Indiana--History
Places: Bloomingdale (Indiana); Parke County (Indiana)
 
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H.P. Lynn home photograph  Save
Description: Photographic reproduction depicting a house, situated at the southwest corner of Main and Seventh streets in Lafayette, Tippecanoe County, Indiana, that was once the residence of H.P. Lynn. It was said to be a station on the Underground Railroad during the Civil War. The name Herbert H. Heimlich is stamped on the back of the photograph, which is from the Wilbur H. Siebert Collection. Siebert (1866-1961) began researching the Underground Railroad in the 1890s as a way to interest his students in history. Text on the front left bottom corner: "This is the former residence of H.P. Lynn, at the south-west corner of Main and Seventh, Father of Mrs. Flora Lynn Sherman, D. A. R. The house was re- puted to have been on of the stations of the "Under- ground Railway" during the Civil War. (L.G. Buckle)" View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: AL03008.tif
Subjects: Underground Railroad -- Indiana; Siebert, Wilbur Henry, 1866-1961
Places: Lafayette (Indiana); Tippecanoe County (Indiana)
 
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Elizur Deming portrait  Save
Description: Photographic reproduction of a portrait depicting Dr. Elizur Deming (1797-1855). Deming was a leading Underground Railroad agent in Lafayette, Tippecanoe County, Indiana. The name Herbert H. Heimlich appears on the back of the photograph, which is from the Wilbur H. Siebert Collection. Siebert (1866-1961) began researching the Underground Railroad in the 1890s as a way to interest his students in history. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: AL03009.tif
Subjects: Deming, E. (Elizur), 1797-1855; Underground Railroad--Indiana; Siebert, Wilbur Henry, 1866-1961; Abolitionists--Indiana--History
Places: Lafayette (Indiana); Tippecanoe County (Indiana)
 
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Newton and Mary Hadley photograph  Save
Description: Photographic reproduction of a daguerreotype portrait of Newton (b. 1832) and Mary Thompson Hadley (b. 1833). They were married on December 5, 1855 and kept an Underground Railroad station in Penn Township, Parke County, Indiana. The image was collected by Ohio State University professor Wilbur H. Siebert (1866-1961). Siebert began researching the Underground Railroad in the 1890s as a way to interest his students in history. View on Ohio Memory.
Image ID: AL03006.tif
Subjects: Underground Railroad -- Indiana; Siebert, Wilbur Henry, 1866-1961; Abolitionists--Indiana--History
Places: Penn Township (Indiana); Parke County (Indiana)
 
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634 matches on "indian*"